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Thread: Long Arm Lift

  1. #1
    Junior Member archero's Avatar
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    Default Long Arm Lift

    I was kicking around and came upon a TeraFlex long arm upgrade kit. I have the 3 in TF lift with shocks. Why would I want to spend an extra $1500 for the long arm upgrade? What does it do that is worth that much extra cash?

    Cort
    ---
    2008 Wrangler X
    RR front bumper with endcaps, hoop and RRC rock rails, 3" Teraflex Lift with shocks, Delta Quad bar headlight upgrade, daystar dash insert, daystar switch panel, remote start kit, "Rubicon Style" wheels with BFG 255/75R17's, Hypertech Programer, Trueflow Extreme Duty Intake, and Crown stainless extended brake lines.

  2. #2
    Mountain Valley Customs
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    IMO, the biggest gain to a long arm upgrade is ride quality. With long arms, you will get your smooth, factory-like ride back. As an added benefit, you will get more flex even though you aren't changing your height.

    If you look at a stock Jeep; at ride height, all of the control arms are level (or near level). Being like that allows for the arms to cycle up and down and the overall length as they do so to remain virtually unchanged.

    Now, take that same Jeep and put taller springs in. Now, at ride height, the arms aren't level. As a result, the geometery has been altered. Now, when you hit a bump, the arm length doesn't remain virtually unchanged through it's range of motion.

    Here's a example that you can try. Hang your arm down next to you. Bend your elbow only and bring your forearm out level in front. Your forearm is now oriented like a stock Jeep control arm (elbow being the frame end). Bending at the elbow only, move your hand up and down. Notice how your fingers (axle) don't move too far (distance from you) throughout the range of motion?

    Now, bring your elbow back to level in front of you. Point your forearm down at about a 20* angle. Use this as your start point. Now cycle your forearm, again bending only at the elbow. Notice your fingers.

    Now, extend your whole arm out level in front. Point your arm downward at about 10*. Use this as your start point. Now cycle your entire arm. Notice your fingers.

    Does any of my rambling help?
    Mountain Valley Customs www.mvcustoms.com 570.217.7284
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  3. #3
    Jeepless Zombie Slayer... JoeySnow70's Avatar
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    Default

    What are your goals, plans or purpose for your Jeep... If your goin to wheel ocasionally and depending the terrain the LA dont seem to be worth the money. You could get plenty of SA suspension lifts with great ride maybe even better than stock. Thts my .02....



    Quote Originally Posted by crazy4ink View Post
    Here's a example that you can try. Hang your arm down next to you. Bend your elbow only and bring your forearm out level in front. Your forearm is now oriented like a stock Jeep control arm (elbow being the frame end). Bending at the elbow only, move your hand up and down. Notice how your fingers (axle) don't move too far (distance from you) throughout the range of motion?

    Now, bring your elbow back to level in front of you. Point your forearm down at about a 20* angle. Use this as your start point. Now cycle your forearm, again bending only at the elbow. Notice your fingers.

    Now, extend your whole arm out level in front. Point your arm downward at about 10*. Use this as your start point. Now cycle your entire arm. Notice your fingers.

    Does any of my rambling help?
    Thats a cool way to explain the SA and LA...

  4. #4
    Junior Member greenbean's Avatar
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    Yes, that is a good explanation although even with a longarm the geometry will not equal the stock factory engineered setup due to the fact that most people are going to add some type of lift height to the springs. But given the same spring with a shortarm setup then add a longarm setup the physics of it all get much better. Articulation, "Great articulation!" are selling points to these setups because you want the suspension to cycle fully and keep those tires on the ground for traction whenever possible. A longarm will keep said tire in contact with the terrain long after a shortarm setup would have lifted said tire and lost traction. Also be aware that they are multiple longarm setups from a number of vendors. You have your radius arm setups, Rubicon Express, Clayton, Nth/AEV to name a few. You also have what I feel are a better design with front 3 or 4 link + Trac bar, and rear Triangulated or double trianulated that eliminates the trac bar. Many people will argue insanely about what is better but if you look at it objectively there is NO WAY a radius arm setup will be as strong as a true 3 or 4 link. Also as far as the rear goes, unless you are doing a stretch setup say on a TJ SWB, it wouldn't be beneficial to do the double-triangulated rear as that is tight enough that it would eat up a lot of bushings/heims/Jonny joints whatever. Stretch the rear out double tri is good to go, standard Wheel base you can go with the upper triangulated and the lowers straight, and still have the benefit of loosing the trac bar which creates room underneath and allows that greater range of motion or "Articulation" Anywho I've ran my suck enough and probably didn't say a whole lot of anything!

    Will
    2006 Rubicon, FT 6" Long Arm, Swayloc DR swaybar, CV rear Driveshaft, JKS 1.25" Body, 1" motor mount lift, ARB Dif covers,...etc.
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  5. #5
    Junior Member archero's Avatar
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    Very nice. I can see why one would want to spend the extra money now. However I can see many more things needed before this. At $1500 its probably something that could move to the bottom of the list for what I do anyhow. Thanks for the replies. I knew there was a good answer otherwise there would not be so many on the market.

    Cort
    ---
    2008 Wrangler X
    RR front bumper with endcaps, hoop and RRC rock rails, 3" Teraflex Lift with shocks, Delta Quad bar headlight upgrade, daystar dash insert, daystar switch panel, remote start kit, "Rubicon Style" wheels with BFG 255/75R17's, Hypertech Programer, Trueflow Extreme Duty Intake, and Crown stainless extended brake lines.

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