User Tag List

Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: What's Needed For A Tune-Up

  1. #1
    Non-MVC Supporter Military Jeeper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    512

    Branch
    Navy
    Status
    Serving
    Served
    1994 to Present

    Closest Installation

    Fort Myer
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default What's Needed For A Tune-Up

    I'd like to do a tune-up on the CJ (304 V8) and I need to know what components make up a tune-up?

    I've recently changed the following:

    Oil
    Air Filter (K&N 14" X-Stream)

    What else needs done, I'm guessing the following:

    Wires (They look new.....having said that I bought the Jeep 3 yrs ago)
    Plugs (What plugs do you recommend, what gapping as well)
    Distributor

    Is there anything else I'm missing? Also, what brand do you recommend.....or what upgrades would you recommend if replacing these parts?
    NOTE: I DO NOT ENDORSE MOUNTAIN VALLEY CUSTOMS (MVC) FOR ANY 4x4 MODIFICATIONS - PM ME IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS WHY!

    (To those who wonder, I am NOT the club founder, this has been my screen name for over 10 yrs on all other forums and ironically this site is called "Military Jeepers"......contact miljeep for forum related questions)

  2. #2
    Administrator Truck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Manassas
    Posts
    1,011

    Branch
    Air Force
    Status
    Retired
    Served
    1990 to 2010

    Closest Installation

    Fort Belvoir
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    typical tune up is plugs/distributer cap/rotor (points if you have them). I personally like Bosch platinum plugs. As long as wire are good leave them but if there is any question get new ones. If you really want to upgrade get a HEI or TFI distributer set up. That will give your engine more spark. It will start better and burn fuel better. Plenty of write ups out there on HEI or TFI conversions out there. There is a guy on ebay that sells everything as a kit with some pretty good support that is a reasonable price.

    Truck
    Quote Originally Posted by korisu56 View Post
    Im in no position to. Mine doesn't work.
    Quote Originally Posted by miljeep View Post
    Oh, thanks to Nate who stopped by tonight and helped a struggling old bald man pitch a tent.
    83 Scrambler, bought in 94...starting to rust away..."we can rebuild him" Now in pieces all over the garage
    82 Scrambler, bought in 05, chevy 305/TH350/NP205
    86 CUCV Maintanance truck w/12KW PTO driven generator & air compressor
    83 Scrambler-151/T176/D300...basically stock..possible restoration for DD duties

  3. #3
    Non-MVC Supporter Military Jeeper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    512

    Branch
    Navy
    Status
    Serving
    Served
    1994 to Present

    Closest Installation

    Fort Myer
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Thanks for the pointers......
    NOTE: I DO NOT ENDORSE MOUNTAIN VALLEY CUSTOMS (MVC) FOR ANY 4x4 MODIFICATIONS - PM ME IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS WHY!

    (To those who wonder, I am NOT the club founder, this has been my screen name for over 10 yrs on all other forums and ironically this site is called "Military Jeepers"......contact miljeep for forum related questions)

  4. #4
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    9

    Branch
    Marine Corps
    Status
    Served
    Served
    1978 to 1984

    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    I have a different view of 'Spring Tune Up'...

    Usually in the Fall, I drain and replace fluids in my Trans, Transfer, and differentials, so I don't leave water on my gears all winter...
    One less headache in the spring.

    If you didn't do the same, it's probably a good idea to check your diffs, trans, transfer, ect.

    Also a good time to check wheel bearings/brakes so you don't start the season with bad grease or wheel bearings/brakes.

    Then I move to the engine.
    Time to service the battery and battery cables.
    Nothing sucks more than to get stranded by one of those cheap discount store cables or lead battery terminals!

    Once the battery is serviced, fully charged and the cables are doing what they are supposed to,
    I check the charging system.
    Noting like getting the mud-dobbers out of the alternator before they cause problems!

    Radiator/Anti-Freeze/Coolant is next.
    Most people don't realize that most anti-freeze/coolant turns acidic after about two or three years, and starts to do damage instead of protect!

    Then it's an oil and filter change.
    Mostly because an engine sitting all winter will collect water from the atmosphere, through heating and cooling condensation,
    And,
    Partly because I run a thicker oil in the summer, and this is a good time to make the switch.

    If you used a fuel stabilizer in the fall, and remembered to fill up the tank completely so condensation couldn't collect in the empty air spaces, then you are ready to change the fuel filter, and test the fuel pump for flow and leaks...

    If that goes well, then hook up the fuel line to the carb, and use a small squirt bottle to fill the carb float bowl so you don't have to crank on the engine a bunch to pump fuel into the carb, and start the engine, warm it up...

    If all that goes well, Choke works fine, and it runs OK, the thermostat opens when it's supposed to, ect.
    Then shut it down and let it cool down...

    This is a good time to let the extra pressure out of the tires...
    An extra 10 or 15 pounds of pressure in each tire will help fight flat spotting when it's setting, but you don't want to drive with that extra pressure.

    Also a good time to check lights, plates, registration, fire extingusher, make sure the first aid kit makes it back in the jeep, check for emergency tools, like flash light and tire tools, jack handle, ect...

    When the engine cools down, check the plugs, plug wires, distributor cap terminals, rotor terminal, dielectric grease the boots on both ends, make sure the cap has a bead of grease where it mates to the housing, and if you are a perfectionist, put a dab of dielectric grease on the rotor nose, ect.

    Once that is done, check/set the timing and curb idle with the engine running.

    I know there is a dozen little things like the PCV and vacuum hoses but this post is getting too long the way it is...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Get the MJ Supporter Membership for a little less than $0.06 a day and get more space, 2 MJ Stickers and no banners ads. [Check it out]